Police Singular Or Plural

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Borrowed words -i, -en, -a, -es, -ae

Police definition is - the department of government concerned primarily with maintenance of public order, safety, and health and enforcement of laws and possessing executive, judicial, and legislative powers. Check out our other videos here & Plural Nouns by Adding 'S'Hello Kids,In this video of English Grammar we will know how we should. Most nouns form their plurals by adding -s to the singular. However, there are some nouns that have only a plural form or a singular form. Plural nouns should be followed by a plural verb and singular nouns should be followed by a singular verb. Fill in the blanks. Singular: Plural: No Singular Form: No Plural Form: pencil car city woman book dictionary lesson foot: pencils cars cities women books dictionaries lessons feet: cattle trousers scissors pliers police glasses pants shorts: news information measles furniture baggage advice knowledge rubbish. Series can be singular or plural without the word itself changing. Series is a count noun, describing a group of things or events usually occurring in succession, such as a television series. It is usually seen in constructions like 'a series of,' and like other count nouns, in these sentences the members of the group are pluralized while.

Thought Police Singular Or Plural

LATIN WORDS

In words borrowed from Latin, the Latin plural forms are used.

SINGULAR—USPLURAL – i

cactus

cacti cactuses

Learn english online with native teacher. focus /ˈfoʊkəs/

foci /ˈfoʊsaɪ, -kaɪ/ (focuses)

fungus /ˈfʌŋ-gəs/

fungi /ˈfʌn-dʒaɪ,ˈfʌŋ-gaɪ/

nucleus /ˈnu-kli-əs/

nuclei /ˈnu-kli-ˌaɪ/

stimulus

stimuli

syllabus /ˈsɪl-ə-bəs/

syllabi /ˈsɪl-ə-baɪ/

SINGULAR—ON, —UMPLURAL –A

phenomenonGreek / Latin

Jobs and workplaces vocabulary. phenomena /fɪˈ-nɒ-mə-nə/

criterion Greek / Latin

criteria

bacterium Latin

bacteria

curriculum Latin

curricula

datum Latin

data /de-tə, dæ-tə, dɑ-tə/

medium Latin

media

memorandum Latin

memoranda

SINGULAR—APlural –AE

formula /ˈfɔrmyələ/ Latin

formulas / formulae /ˈfɔrm-yə-li/

vertebra Latin

vertebrae /ˈvɜr təˌbri, -ˌbreɪ/

SINGULAR—IX, —EXPlural –ICES, –ES,

appendix /əˈpɛn-dɪks/ Latin

appendices / ixes /əˈpɛn-də-siz/

index Latin

indices / indexes

Police Singular Or Plural
OLD ENGLISH WORDS OR GREEK WORDS

In some words, the plurals are derived (come) from older language forms.

SINGULARPLURAL –EN

*man /mæn/ from Middle English

men /mɛn/

**woman /ˈwʊmən/

women /ˈwɪmɪn/

child /tʃaɪld/

children /ˈtʃɪl-drən/

ox

oxen /ˈɒksən/

SINGULAR –IS from GreekPLURAL –ES

analysisGreek

analyses

basis Greek

bases

crisis Greek

crises

emphasis Greek

emphases

hypothesis Greek

hypotheses

oasis /oʊˈeɪsɪs/ Greek › Egyptian

oases /oʊˈeɪsiz/

parenthesis /pəˈrɛn-θə-sɪs/ Greek

parentheses /pəˈrɛn-θə--siz/

thesis /ˈθi-sɪs/ Greek

theses /ˈθi-siz/

IPA Pronunciation Key

SingularPolice Singular Or Plural

*man— before 900; (noun) Middle English; Old English man ( n ); cognate with German Mann, Dutch man, Old Norse mathr, Gothic manna; (V) Middle English mannen, Old English mannian to garrison

SingularPolice singular or plural

**woman— before 900; Middle English womman, wimman, Old English wīfman, equivalent to wīf female + man human being; see wife, man1

octopus (The Greek plural is octopodes.) The English plural is octopuses. The word is not of Latin origin, so it is not *octopi. See link below.

'Subversive Facts: Describing language objectively need not meaning doing so dispassionately.' Johnson. The Economist, 16 Mar. 2017. economist.com/news/books-and-arts/21718850-describing-language-objectively-need-not-meaning-doing-so-dispassionately-subversive-facts.