Not Have Past Simple

  • by admin
  • 9 Comments!

Hey everybody!

Learn to speak anglo saxon language

Not Have Simple Past Tense

Finally, the present perfect form ('I have not seen it before.' ) is correct if the two have not yet finished the episode, because B is talking about an experience that he has not had before. (See here for a simple explanation of the uses of the present perfect.) Conclusion. Future perfect simple ( I will have worked eight hours ) - English Grammar Today - a reference to written and spoken English grammar and usage - Cambridge Dictionary. Complete the following sentences using the past simple in English: 1. My father (go) to work by car yesterday. This morning I (have) a shower. My sister (not clean) her room on Saturday. The birds (fly) over our heads. Last week my family (buy) a new table for the dinning room. The other day, I (lose) my math’s book.

Simple Past Tense Explanation

How are you all? Good, we hope! So, we’ve previously looked at the modal verb “can” in the present tense and “cannot” or “can’t” in negative form in the present tense and it was relatively simple, right? Well, today we are going to look at how to use “can” in the past simple.

Not Have Past Simple Sentences

Simple Past (Summary) be, do, have and irregular verbs in the Simple Past; Diagram of the Simple Past; Form of the Simple Past; Pronunciation of -ed; Questions in the Simple Past; Short/contracted and long forms in the Simple Past; Signal words for the Simple Past; Spelling of verbs in the Simple Past; Use of the Simple Past. How to use “can” in the past simple. Like in the present tense where “can” is the conjugation used for all subjects, we can all rejoice once again as in the past simple “could” is the conjugation for all subjects too with not one subject having an exception. In the negative in past simple we would say “could not.

How to use “can” in the past simple

Like in the present tense where “can” is the conjugation used for all subjects, we can all rejoice once again as in the past simple “could” is the conjugation for all subjects too with not one subject having an exception. In the negative in past simple we would say “could not” or with contraction “couldn’t”.

Examples:

I could ski ten years ago.

I couldn’t sleep last night.

Not Have Past Simple

Questions with “could”

Like when we form questions in the present tense with “can” by inverting the verb and the subject, you’ll be very happy to know that it is that simple in the past with “could” as well.

Examples:

Could you understand her?

Could he get the TV to work?

RegularPast

Furthermore, like in the present tense with “can”, we can also do the same in the past simple with “could”

Examples:

Could you understand what he said?

Yes, I could

Could she understand the question?

Yes, she could.

Could he pay the bill?

Yes, he could

Could they solve the problem?

Yes they could.

Impossibility with “couldn’t”

Like in the present tense when we use “can’t” to express impossibility, “couldn’t” is used in the past to express the same.

Examples:

We couldn’t park in front of the entrance.

He couldn’t enter the country. He didn’t have a visa.

We couldn’t take the children to see the film. It was for adults only.

Past

They couldn’t take photos in the museum. It was forbidden.

If you couldn’t practise this grammar point before…

If you were not able to express inability or impossibility in the past before reading this, then now is your chance to practise this grammar point as much as you can until you have it mastered. What are you waiting for? It’s time to practise!

Korean learning books online. If you would like to read more similar articles Click here!

Grammar Past Simple

Introduction

In the simple past tense, negative and question forms are made using the auxiliary verb 'do' (in its past form, 'did') followed by the simple form of the main verb. This page explains the rules.

1. Forming a negative

Negatives in the simple past are formed by adding didn't (informal) or did not (formal) before the simple form of the verb. The verb BE is an exception to this; in the case of BE, we just add n't (informal) or not (formal) after 'was' or 'were':

Simple past statement Informal negative Formal negative
I had a car. I didn't have a car. I did not have a car.
You ate my toast. You didn't eat my toast. You did not eat my toast.
He was here yesterday. He wasn't here yesterday. He was not here yesterday.
They were in the park. They weren't in the park. They were not in the park.

2. Forming a yes/no question

Yes/no questions are also created using the auxiliary did. This time, the auxiliary is placed before the subject. The verb BE is an exception; in this case, we move BE before the subject. Here are the rules:

Simple past statement Yes/no question
He brought his friend. Did he bring his friend?
They had a party. Did they have a party?
You were here. Were you here?
She was sick. Was she sick?

3. Forming a WH- question

WH- questions (using words such as 'what', 'when', and 'where') are also created by putting the auxiliary did before the subject (or moving BE, as explained above). Then, you add the WH- word at the beginning. Here are some examples:

Statement Yes/no question WH- question
The building fell down. Did the building fall down? Why did the building fall down?
They lived in Vancouver. Did they live in Vancouver? Where did they live?
The store was closed. Was the store closed? Why was the store closed?
They were wolves. Were they wolves? What were they?

When you are sure that you understand the lesson, you can continue with the exercises.